🎰 Flash Boys - Wikipedia

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hours after Goldman called the FBI, McSwain arrested Serge. Thus the only Goldman Sachs employee arrested by the FBI in the aftermath of FLASH BOYS.


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The narrative, captured in Flash Boys, the Michael Lewis bestseller, recast high-frequency trading — where investors deploy ever-faster.


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The narrative, captured in Flash Boys, the Michael Lewis bestseller, recast high-frequency trading — where investors deploy ever-faster.


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Michael Lewis Reflects on His Book Flash Boys, a Year After It Shook deal about the social consequences of their trading—but perhaps it's.


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As author Michael Lewis described in Flash Boys, many in the $14 million, and its CEO was fired in the aftermath of the book's publication.


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As author Michael Lewis described in Flash Boys, many in the $14 million, and its CEO was fired in the aftermath of the book's publication.


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trading programmer – and by the way, he is still dealing with the aftermath of Lewis's Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt “fictionalized non-fiction” book about.


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Michael Lewis Reflects on His Book Flash Boys, a Year After It Shook deal about the social consequences of their trading—but perhaps it's.


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flash boys aftermath

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The narrative, captured in Flash Boys, the Michael Lewis bestseller, recast high-frequency trading — where investors deploy ever-faster.


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trading programmer – and by the way, he is still dealing with the aftermath of Lewis's Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt “fictionalized non-fiction” book about.


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flash boys aftermath

Katsuyama and his band concluded that high-frequency traders, working hand in glove with the exchanges and big banks, were ripping off investors to the tune of billions of dollars. Were high-frequency traders and their Wall Street allies to blame? That proved harder than expected. What are they like? Why would this be? When, like Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland setting out to stage a backyard musical, they decided to quit their jobs at RBC and create their own exchange, their idea was to create a market free from conflicts of interest and openly at odds with the high-frequency traders. The traders themselves remain faceless adversaries of Katsuyama and his buddies. They are much less of a villain than I thought. Who are these people? Lewis never penetrates their high-tech lairs, or even seems to have tried. Foremost among them seem to be the exchanges — the New York Stock Exchange, Nasdaq and BATS, to name some — which are happy to sell their order flow to high-frequency traders and thus have a financial stake in perpetuating their practices. Lewis singles out Goldman Sachs as among the most egregious offenders. Home Page World U.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} This seems an amalgam of insider trading and front-running, both illegal in other contexts but, evidently, perfectly lawful here. Schneiderman, has started an investigation into the sale of trading data by exchanges. Lewis repeatedly castigates Goldman for its alleged complicity in the financial crisis, and the firm played the role of the heavy in the saga of Sergey Aleynikov, about whom Lewis wrote at length in Vanity Fair and whom he rather awkwardly inserts into his narrative here. High-frequency traders have plenty of accomplices, as Katsuyama and Ryan discovered. How much money do they make and what do they do with it? Among those who seemed unconcerned were reporters at The Wall Street Journal, to whom Gates took his claims, and officials at the Securities and Exchange Commission who turned a deaf ear. Book Review Gone in 0. And the New York attorney general, Eric T. In February the S. Katsuyama shocked a group of investors when he told them how the banks were colluding against them. A mild-mannered Canadian Everyman with a capacity for moral judgment all too rare on Wall Street, Katsuyama seemed as befuddled as the rest of us by the explosion of the superfast, computer-driven trading that now accounts for an estimated 50 percent of all transactions in the stock market. So, too, do the big banks that run so-called dark pools, matching buyer and seller, and that sell their trading information. Armed with knowledge of large buy and sell orders, high-frequency traders dart in ahead of the trades, capturing a tiny spread between bid and ask prices that may last for a millisecond or two. Evidently idealism has its limits. The system has let down the investor. And are they really so bad? Given that the fourth anniversary of the flash crash is approaching, it seems not a moment too soon. In Katsuyama, Lewis has found a good guide into the esoteric and highly technical world of high-frequency trading. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}For Brad Katsuyama, then a young equities trader at Royal Bank of Canada, a life-changing revelation about the stock market began in June with a mystery: Why, when he tried to buy stocks at the offered prices on his computer screen, did the offers instantly vanish and the prices pop higher? Then, at blazing speed, they cancel the offers, buy the shares, drive up the price by a few cents and resell them to a real buyer. But surely Goldman Sachs must be among the villains? Stock Market. Something certainly seems rotten here. How do they do what they do?